I remember my first Pow-Wow and how the music of the drums seemed to keep beat with my heart and soul. At first I felt embarrassed and was unsure whether I could perform the Native dances or would look foolish.┬áIt is certainly normal to not be confident, but it is not until you join the circle of dance that your best comes out. … Dont Just Sit There –Dance »»

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National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)

Current Issues and activities of the NCAI include:

  • Protection of programs and services to benefit Indian families, specifically targeting Indian  Youth and elders

 

  • Promotion and support of Indian education, including Head Start, elementary, post-secondary and Adult Education

 

  • Enhancement of Indian health care, including prevention of juvenile substance abuse, HIV-AIDS prevention and other major diseases

 

  • Support of environmental protection and natural resources management

 

  • Protection of Indian cultural resources and religious freedom rights

 

  • Promotion of the Rights of Indian economic opportunity both on and off reservations, including securing programs to provide incentives for economic development and the attraction of private capital to Indian Country

 

  • Protection of the Rights of all Indian people to decent, safe and affordable housing

 

 National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)
1301 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 200, Washington D.C. 20036
Phone: (202) 466-7767, Fax: (202) 466-7797
Email:
[email protected]

The Nation Votes

The Cherokees are known as a “Nation”, not a tribe, or a band. The fact that the Cherokees are designated a nation indicates that they are an amalgamation of many peoples which have banded together in tribal relationships to form a society, culture, and means of governing themselves.  

As a nation or amalgamation of people, there is no statement possible of who can or cannot be traced as Cherokee. Is the lure for federal funds, loans, housing, education, and medical care so irresistible that a people would begin to disown itself?

Is a few wampum beads, firearms, and jug of alcohol enough to forget the pain and agony that was experienced by the Freedman as they suffered, bled and died on the forced march, The Trail of Tears?  

Now the courts will be sought to arbitrate history and whose version of suffering was legitimate. Well as the elders say, “It keeps you praying”.  

Written by Cherokee Cloud 

Posted March 10, 2007