I remember my first Pow-Wow and how the music of the drums seemed to keep beat with my heart and soul. At first I felt embarrassed and was unsure whether I could perform the Native dances or would look foolish.┬áIt is certainly normal to not be confident, but it is not until you join the circle of dance that your best comes out. … Dont Just Sit There –Dance »»

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“Amazing Grace” song by Micmac Tribe

"Amazing Grace" song – Micmac Version:

Wleyuti tán tel-wltáq
Kisi-wsîtawíik
Néwt keskaiap, Niké wéjíimk
Nekapikwaiap niké welapi
Wleyuti kisi-kinámatk nkamlamun
Aq pa kisiknewálik
Ankmayiw ikáq wleyuti
Teli-nqasék ketlamsîtm
Tán tetuji-wltáq Sésus wtuisunm
Wjit ketlamsvtmútitéwk
Wnmajótíl, jileiwaqnn aq kwetaiwekl
Kaqi-ksikásikl

Wleyuti tán tel-wltáq
Kisi-wsîtawíik, Néwt keskaiap
Niké wéjíimk
Nekapikwaiap niké welapi

 

"Amazing Grace" song – English Version

Amazing grace! How sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost, but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.
'Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
And grace my fears relieved.
How precious did that grace appear
The hour I first believed.
How sweet the name of Jesus sounds
In a believer's ear
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds
And drives away his fear.
Amazing grace! How sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me.
I once was lost, but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.
 
 

 

The Micmacs of eastern Canada and the northeastern corner of the United States

(who prefer the phonetic spelling Mi'kmaq) first appeared in their homeland approximately

ten thousand years ago.

 

 

“Lord’s Prayer” by Chinook Indians

“Lord’s Prayer” by the Chinook Indians

Nesika papa klaksta mitlite kopa saghalie
(Our Father Who dwells on High)

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Aleut and Inuit

Although Arctic peoples shared many ways of life, there were significant variations across the four main groups. In cultural terms, the Central Inuit practiced ways of life often considered typical for Arctic peoples. They lived in snow houses called igloos, traveled in lightweight skin boats called kayaks, and used sleds and dog teams. However, one Central Inuit group, the Caribou Inuit, were an inland people who hunted the animals for which they are named and fished freshwater lakes. Their way of life was similar to that of peoples of the Subarctic culture area. The Copper Inuit, another Central Inuit group, were unusual in that they used copper surface nuggets found in their territory to craft tools. The Inuit of southern Alaska had regular trade contacts with Athapaskan Subarctic peoples, among other Indians, and adopted some of their customs. The Aleut, because of their location on the Pacific Coast and frequent contact with coastal peoples to the south, exhibited some cultural traits similar to those found in the Northwest Coast culture area.Excerpts from Wikipedia and MSN Encarta

 

Aleut and Inuit
FIRST NATION HISTORY
FIRST NATION HISTORY (K)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (Mas)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (I)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (Mi)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (Mo)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (Na – Ne)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (Ni)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (O)
FIRST NATION HISTORY (P)
FIRST NATIONS HISTORY (D)
FIRST NATIONS HISTORY (E)
FIRST NATIONS HISTORY (H)
FIRST NATIONS HISTORY (B)
FIRST NATIONS HISTORY (C)
History of the Apache
History of the Lakota
Nez Perce
The “Blackfoot” Confederacy
The “Chickahominy” Indian Tribe
The “Crow” Native Americans
The Arapaho
The Aztecs/Mexicas
The Chickamauga
The Incas
The Mayans
The Wampanoag
Who or What are the Melungeons?